Brown grass over cesspool

In this article we will discuss brown grass over cesspool. True lawn masters know a well-maintained lawn when they see one. It’s pretty obvious that many people obsess over their own lawns that most of them have made careers out of it. It’s a science and a love affair that can never be completely understood. Perhaps it’s a fascination at how the balance of care affects the lawn’s condition. Or maybe it’s the attention given to the plants that totally makes a huge difference.

Well, an ideal lawn or property to the untrained eye would be entirely green and perfectly manicured. It would be a property that would entice you to step on it but you would just change your mind because you’re afraid you might damage it. It’s a post-card or poster type of lawn that resembles a green ocean. But let an experienced lawn guy look at the grass and he will tell you that if there is a patch of brown there, the lawn’s perfect. You may think of that guy as some sort of a loon but he’s right. If there is a patch of brown, preferably over the cesspool, then the homeowner is doing a great job in caring for the property.

The cesspool is the wastewater treatment system that’s still being used by many homeowners in the country. It resembles the modern septic system but it lacks the outflow pipe. Instead, it’s surrounded by perforations and a soil absorption system to which the pre-treated effluent drains. Since the onset of the recession, homeowners decided that it would be more practical to keep their cesspool and not replace it with a new septic system. It would cost too much for them to do this. They have to prioritize making it back on their feet first before spending thousands of dollars on a brand new septic system.

There should be brown grass over the cesspool. It’s ideal because the brown coloration of the grass indicates the dryness of the cesspool area. It means that the cesspool is functioning optimally. You should immediately call on the septic expert if the grass over the cesspool is dark green and soggy. This would mean that the cesspool is suffering from an internal leak or a heavy clog.

When you see the brown grass over the cesspool, you should not be alarmed. You shouldn’t even water it. Watering the brown grass would immediately saturate the aerobic bacteria that lives in the topsoil on which the brown grass is planted. When the aerobic bacteria get saturated, they will die because they’re deprived of oxygen. The aerobic bacteria are responsible for regulating the biomat in the soil absorption area that rids the pre-treated effluent of pathogens before they’re returned to the surrounding environment. The aerobic bacteria also break down any minute solid waste particle left in the pre-treated effluent. If you water the brown grass over the cesspool, then this will severely alter the ideal condition of the cesspool. The additional water that you want to pour over the brown grass will push the untreated effluent back into the house and over the yard itself, increasing the water load.

It would be best to leave the brown grass over the cesspool alone. Dark green and soggy grass is an indicator that the cesspool is having some clogged areas or damaged parts. It’s always best to have a regular cesspool inspection and treatment. The cesspool should always be pumped out on schedule to avoid this type of grass over the cesspool. Talk to your septic expert with regard to the use of bacteria as a form of regular treatment for your cesspool.

Bacteria are th best additives that you could use on your cesspool because they’re organic and they don’t have chemical pollutants that harm the environment and contaminate the clean water supply. They just voraciously eat the solid waste and eliminate the foul cesspool smells that occasionally waft through your home. Regular use of bacteria will ensure brown grass over the cesspool all the time.