Raised mound bacteria shock treatment

This article will cover the age old question on how raised mound bacteria shock treatments work, you’re not stranded in some island and it’s not a dream. Dismay filled you as you look at your yard filled with wet spots with your raised mound towering over it. It didn’t seem real. You’re a very responsible homeowner and worked well with your septic expert with every pump out session and every means of properly using the raised mound system. In the past year, you have made so many alterations in your property just to make sure that your raised mound system didn’t malfunction or fail.

It was difficult enough to find out that your property could only accommodate a raised mound system that was known to be more sensitive than a conventional septic. In the first few months of your stay in your new home, you were like walking on eggshells because you had to make sure that your raised mound was okay at all times.

The raised mound system functions like the conventional septic system. It only has to be raised to adjust to the high water table in your area. It is a special system that could help the percolation rate of the soil that your property has. Your septic expert said that your raised mound system needed a bacteria shock treatment. There are many causes as to why a raised mound system should need a raised mound bacteria shock treatment:

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1. A heavy use of antibacterial solutions and strong chemicals. These kill off the resident bacteria that are supposed to decompose the solid waste materials that enter the system. Without the degradation of these bacteria, the solid wastes accumulate at a faster rate. This clogs up the system. Backing up and eventual failure occurs.

2. Dumping of prescription medications, namely antibiotics. Antibiotics eliminate the bacterial population in the raised mound system.

You were guilty of the second reason because your grandmother started living with your for almost a year already and she was on three kinds of antibiotics. You didn’t agree on putting her in a nursing home because you weren’t sure of the kind of care they would give her.

The septic expert immediately worked on your septic because it wasn’t good for anyone’s health for the wastewater to stay much longer above ground. The raised mound bacteria shock treatment was literally a “shock” because of the large amount of non-pathogenic bacteria that’s poured into the system. The good bacteria that enters the raised mound, aggressively break down the solid waste materials, allowing the free movement of the wastewater so that it may undergo normal wastewater treatment stages.

After the treatment, the septic expert and his team cleaned up your property. The odors were significantly lessened. It just a couple of weeks, your raised mound system returned to normal. The septic expert said that you should continue using the raised mound system properly. Since your grandmother will be staying with you indefinitely, a monthly raised mound bacteria shock treatment was recommended by your septic expert.

When your septic expert came back, he said that the following should be done to prevent raised mound malfunction again:

• Transplanting of the newly sprouted seedlings over your raised mound.
Your grandmother seemed to have planted some tomato seeds over your raised mound while you were out.

• Replacement of the rain gutter.
The diverted gutter that you had was already leaking over the raised mound.

• Installation of a second dry well.
You have more laundry and cleaning to do so a helper dry well would make it easier for your raised mound to function.

• You had to remove your grandmother’s buggy that was parked near the raised mound system. It could result to a heavy soil compaction and cause damage to the system.

You were just so busy to notice all of these and agreed with your septic expert. He would be helping in most of the procedures anyway. It was great to know that you are doing a great job with your septic. You just have to keep it up so that your living area would be more suitable for your and for your grandmother. I hope this article covered the age old question on how raised mound bacteria shock treatments work on septic systems.

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